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Military Working Dogs

Military Working Dogs - Adoptions, History, Information, Resources


Nemo In Kennel- photo from Vietnam Veteran Ernie Childers, who gave me permission to post

The Marines demonstrated War Dog Training Exercises      Petty Officer 2nd Class CH and Evy, a military working dog, conduct explosive detection training in San Francisco. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class PB

October 7, 2012  -

Vets Adopt Pets Founder at 2012 San Francisco Fleet Week Marine Military Working Dog exhibit

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It is with GREAT honor that Vets Adopt Pets was able to assist Jason Bos, with referrals needed to get his War Dog Cila home.


More Than a Dog - A Soldier, A Partner

http://www.defense.gov/home/features/2006/Working-Dogs/index.html

Military working dogs first entered the service in March 13, 1942 to serve in the Army’s K-9 Corps. Today, the dogs, who have an actual military service record book assigned to them, are still playing an active role in searching for explosives and seizing the enemy.

Film - Pacific 1942

Facts and History on Military Dogs


 K9 Veterans Day

The following states signed proclamations in 2012 declaring March 13 as K9 Veterans Day, setting the example for the rest of the nation: California,  Delaware. Florida,  Georgia.  Illinois. Michigan,  New Jersey, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, W. Virginia.

Join The National Effort to Make March 13th of Every Year K-9 Veterans' Day


Sgt. Stubby  The first decorated canine war hero and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant was pit bull-type dog named Stubby. Born in 1917, he wandered into a Connecticut National Guard encampment on the Yale University campus. He was a scrawny little pup of about 4-weeks-old, found there by John Robert Conroy who smuggled his beloved companion aboard the troop ship, the SS Minnesota.

Civil War Dog Camp Comfort  Then-Lt. George Custer with his dog during the Peninsula Campaign, 1862. Throughout history dogs have provided companionship and comfort in the midst of war. Library of Congress photo

Jack Brutus was another fine soldier (shown here in uniform). Serving during the Spanish-American war, he became the official mascot for Company K, First Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. “Old Jack,” as he was known, and his unit spent most of the war encamped at various places in the states providing coastal defense from Maine to Virginia. Old Jack died of spinal troubles in 1898.The pit bull’s steady temperament, extreme level of intelligence, acceptance of training and steadfast sense of loyalty made them the perfect military mascot.


I first learned about Military Working Dogs from a Vietnam Veteran.  He spoke of how his dog was his best friend and partner and how much he loved that dog.  One day in the line of duty Veteran sent his dog into a hole.  He said the dog turned and looked at him with love in his eyes.  Being the brave soldier with a tail, the dog licked his handlers face and proceeded to do his job.  I'll  never forget the look on the Veterans face when he shared this story.  Decades later Veteran still grieved that moment that changed his life forever when his best friend sacrificed his life to save the Veterans life.

Vets Adopt Pets.org supports Military Working Dogs

*H.R. 5314

To require the immediate termination of the Department of Defense practice of euthanizing military working dogs at the end of their useful working life and to facilitate the adoption of retired military working dogs by law enforcement agencies, former handlers of these dogs, and other persons capable of caring for these dogs. *Full Text


Vets Adopt Pets supports MILITARY WORKING DOGS — U.S. Air Force military working dog Jackson sits on a U.S. Vehicle before heading out on a mission.  DOD - MilitaryWorking Dogs unfortunately used to be euthanized after retired from military duty, but they are now adopted out.  In 2000 President Clintonsigned H.B. 5314 which allows Military Dogs to be adopted.  Usually these dogs are adopted by military folks as they already have a relationship with the dog.

A U.S. Army soldier and his militaryworking dog jump off the ramp of a helicopter during training

He, She, They ain't heavy ... He's, She's, They're our brother, sister, cousin...

Military Working Dogs Save Many Lives From locating improvised explosive devices to identifying weapons caches, these trained dogs assist troops with Operation Enduring Freedom

“People don’t realize how many lives MWDs save,” said Chief Master at Arms RN, kennel master of Naval Station Rota's Security Department. “There are several instances in which MWDs have located explosive-laden vehicles or improvised explosive devices (IED) designed to kill or injure U.S. forces, as well as locating numerous weapons caches of small arms and ordnance used by insurgents and terrorists.”

Master at Arms 1st Class JC, accompanied by MWD Dino, was the first Naval Station Rota dog handler to go to Iraq. “The dog becomes your best friend, because it is with you 24/7,” said C. “The dog loves unconditionally, and that is a great feeling.”

"Danang, Vietnam, 1969 Muzzled sentry dogs and their handlers ride in the back of a truck as they return from a patrol. R. A. Elder / Hulton Archive / Getty Images"


 

http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=62703

 

BR, 12, gets a somber kiss from Eli, a bomb-sniffing military working dog, during a retirement and adoption ceremony at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, Feb. 3, 2011. The Labrador retriever was assigned to Brady's older brother, Marine Corps Pfc. CR, who was killed in Afghanistan. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. BDI. See Movie

 

 http://www.defense.gov/homepagephotos/homepagephotos.aspx?y=2010&m=3

 

ROC, KISMA AND JAMPY - U.S. Air Force military working dogs Roc, Kisma and Jampy pose for a photo at the military working dog kennels on Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., March 25, 2010. The three working dogs, assigned to the 56th Security Forces Squadron, are scheduled to be medically retired April 6, 2010.U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. JC

 

http://www.defense.gov/News/NewsArticle.aspx?ID=55678

 

 

Air Force Staff Sgt. CQ holds her puppy, which will enter the military working dog program in a year at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. The dogs are enrolled in a 60- to 90-day training program, where they are trained in explosive and drug detection, deterrence and handler protection. U.S. Air Force photo by CG

 

The
 341st Training Squadron at Lackland Air Force Base operates a breeding
program for military working dogs in support of the Department of
Defense Military Working Dog program. These dogs are a vital part of our
 national defense and serve in Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps
units around the globe. You can become part of this important effort by
volunteering your home and time to raise a military working dog." title="The
 341st Training Squadron at Lackland Air Force Base operates a breeding
program for military working dogs in support of the Department of
Defense Military Working Dog program. These dogs are a vital part of our
 national defense and serve in Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps
units around the globe. You can become part of this important effort by
volunteering your home and time to raise a military working dog.

 

The 341st Training Squadron at Lackland Air Force Base operates a breeding program for military working dogs in support of the Department of Defense Military Working Dog program. These dogs are a vital part of our national defense and serve in Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps units around the globe. You can become part of this important effort by volunteering your home and time to raise a military working dog.


Courtesy United States War Dogs Association

War Dogs Music & Lyrics by Murray Weinstock


When I left my home in the U.S.A.
I was one of many trained a special way
There was a war going on, and I was sent to help
Never did I complain, never whine, never yelp


The training hours went long, they work you to the bone
When you're part of a team, you gotta hold your own
Sniffing out the bad guys, sniffing out the mines
Scouting up ahead, I'm the point man on the line


War dogs, never lose their way
War dogs, saving night and day
War dogs, we've been led astray
War dogs, left behind, where we'll stay


My handler was a good man, as good as man can be
Nothing I wouldn't do for him, he was top dog to me.
We'd be out in the jungle, sniffing in the air
A flash of light, ghosts in flight, silhouetted by fear


War dogs, never lose their way…


A bond is built forever, forever and a day
Built on love, built on trust, that's the canine way
Out on a mission, we pray for all our friends
That the Shepherd will lead His flock back to safety once again!


War dogs, never lose their way
War dogs, saving night and day
You're a hero forgotten, but that's the way it goes
War dogs, the soldier no one knows


My heart and will's been broken, just lying in this cage
This war has all but left me just a number on the page
Nowhere that I turn can I escape this haunting cry
I'll never understand why I've been left here…to die.


© 2000 Furry Murray Music
? 2004 Lovenotes Records

.... to hear the whole song...

[FLASH] ABC% Explosives Detection 0//.a)b.)1 rray Weinstock http://ww

If the above link doesn't work click below - then the 1st entry on the google search page

https://www.google.com/search?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.defense.gov%2Fhome%2Ffeatures%2F2006%2Fworking-dogs%2FFlash%2FWorking-Dogs-preload-final.swf&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

Sallie was a lady; she was a soldier too. She marched beside the colors, our own red white and blue. It was in the days of our civil war that she lived her life so true. Sallie was a brindle Staffordshire bull terrier (or pit bull terrier – it is unclear) who served as the regimental mascot for the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. She was given to 1st Lt William R. Terry as when she was just 4 weeks of age. Sallie was raised with the men of the regiment and they were fond of her. She knew the specific drum roll announcing reveille. Sallie followed the men closely on marches and to the battlefield, always on the front lines.  In a spring 1863 at a review of the Union army, Sallie marched along with “her” soldiers. Abraham Lincoln sat in the center of the reviewing stand and spotted the dog. He raised his famous hat in salute. At Gettysburg, Sallie became separated from the 11th in all of the chaos. Three days later they found Sallie guarding the bodies of the dead and wounded soldiers, herself unscathed. In 1865 at Hatcher’s Run Sallie was struck by a bullet to the head. She was killed instantly. She was buried on the battlefield while under heavy enemy fire. In 1890 in appreciation of her loyal devotion, a monument of Sallie now stands in Gettysburg, directly in front of the monument that commemorates the 11th Pennsylvania Infantry.     Then and Now     MWD Bruno and Handler O share "a moment" at Creech AFB - "These dogs, no matter what their specialty, are saving US troops,"


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